Zoom Colloquium: The visual white matter: Its structural organization and relation to perception, development, and disease

Zoom Colloquium: The visual white matter: Its structural organization and relation to perception, development, and disease

Past Event Date: 

Speaker: 

Franco Pestilli, Associate Professor Department of Psychology, The University of Texas at Austin

Host: 

Dr. Arvind Chandna

Abstract - Humans rely extensively on their visual system for tasks such as navigation, communication, and social interaction. Loss or damage to vision can have a profound effect on the quality of life. Wheres half of the total brain volume is composed of axons wrapped in myelin sheaths, the majority of visual neuroscience research has focused on neurons, brain areas, and synapses. I will discuss research that advances our understanding of how the visual white matter – the network of connections wrapped in myelin between visual areas– is organized, how it relates to attention, human development, and how it is affected by eye disease.  The research presented in this talk was developed using the BRAIN initiative-funded open-access, free cloud computing platform brainlife.io. The platform is meant to lower the barriers of entry to complex, advanced computational methods from data validation, analysis, and visualization to understand vision, brain structure, and function using neuroimaging data. https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/psychology/faculty/fp4834

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