Events

  • Zoom Brown Bag: Excitatory and Suppressive Contribution to Binocular Interactions in Human Visual Cortex

    Zoom Brown Bag: Excitatory and Suppressive Contribution to Binocular Interactions in Human Visual Cortex

    Event Date:

    Abstract - During binocular viewing, visual inputs from the two eyes interact at the level of visual cortex. In normal vision, visual inputs from the two eyes are balanced. However, in amblyopic vision, visual inputs from the amblyopic eye are reduced due to loss of visual acuity and contrast sensitivity. In this talk, I will present my recent lab work on how excitatory and suppressive interactions contribute to binocular contrast interactions along the visual cortical hierarchy of humans with normal and amblyopic vision, using source-imaged SSVEP and frequency-domain analysis of dichoptic stimuli over a wide range of relative contrast between the two eyes. A dichoptic contrast gain control model was used to characterize binocular interactions in amblyopia and provided a quantitative comparison to normal vision. Our model fits revealed different patterns of binocular interactions between normal and amblyopic vision. Strabismic amblyopia significantly reduced excitatory contributions to binocular interactions, whereas suppressive contributions remained intact. Our results provide robust evidence supporting the view that the preferential loss of excitatory interactions disrupts binocular interactions in strabismic amblyopia. https://www.ski.org/users/chuan-hou

    Improving Zoom accessibility for people with hearing impairments People with hearing impairments often use lipreading and speechreading to improve speech comprehension. This approach is helpful but only works if the speaker’s face and mouth are clearly visible. For the benefit of people with hearing impairments on Zoom calls, please enable your device’s camera whenever you are speaking on Zoom, and face the camera while you speak. (Feel free to disable your camera when you aren’t speaking.)

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  • Zoom Colloquium: Braille Literacy Rates in the U.S.: Knowing What We Don’t Know

    Zoom Colloquium: Braille Literacy Rates in the U.S.: Knowing What We Don’t Know

    Event Date:

    Abstract: For almost as long as braille has existed, researchers, advocates, educators, and innovators have been influenced by assumptions or beliefs about rates of braille readership. However, despite repeated claims in the media and in advocacy materials, U.S. braille literacy statistics have proven difficult to substantiate and clarify. In this session, authors Rebecca Sheffield, Frances Mary D’Andrea, and Sarah Chatfield will discuss their systematic literature review, which began in 2015 in collaboration with Smith-Kettlewell scientist Valerie Morash. The research findings raise numerous questions, including: In the absence of current, reliable data on braille literacy, what evidence is there about the demand for braille-related innovations and research? What lessons should we take from the proliferation of unsupported claims about braille literacy rates? How has the nature of being a “braille reader" changed with the advent of technology? How might researchers approach agreeing on definitions and gathering useful data on braille readership rates?

    Sheffield, R. M., D’Andrea, F. M., Morash, V., & Chatfield, S. (2022). How many braille readers? Policy, politics, and perception. Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, 116(1), 14–25. https://doi.org/10.1177/0145482X211071125

    Improving Zoom accessibility for people with hearing impairments  People with hearing impairments often use lipreading and speechreading to improve speech comprehension. This approach is helpful but only works if the speaker’s face and mouth are clearly visible. For the benefit of people with hearing impairments on Zoom calls, please enable your device’s camera whenever you are speaking on Zoom, and face the camera while you speak. (Feel free to disable your camera when you aren’t speaking.)

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  • Zoom Colloquium: On the interaction between body movements and cognition

    Zoom Colloquium: On the interaction between body movements and cognition

    Event Date:

    Abstract - Cognitive processes are almost exclusively investigated in settings for which voluntary body movements are largely suppressed. However, even basic sensory processes can differ drastically between movement states. My special interest therefore lies in the naturally behaving system. We investigate the interaction between cognition, oscillatory brain activity and body movements in freely moving humans through the application of various mobile approaches. Within this scope we ask how walking influences attentional visual processes, auditory perception and creativity. Concerning smaller movements as well as the interaction between different types of movements, we focus on eye related movements, such as spontaneous eyeblinks, saccades and pupil size. Our work shows complementary neurophysiological and behavioral evidence of the importance of movement and movement state when considering simple as well as complex cognitive processes. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Barbara-Haendel

    Improving Zoom accessibility for people with hearing impairments People with hearing impairments often use lipreading and speechreading to improve speech comprehension. This approach is helpful but only works if the speaker’s face and mouth are clearly visible. For the benefit of people with hearing impairments on Zoom calls, please enable your device’s camera whenever you are speaking on Zoom, and face the camera while you speak. (Feel free to disable your camera when you aren’t speaking.)

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  • Special Zoom Colloquium: Hacker Calculus

    Special Zoom Colloquium: Hacker Calculus

    Event Date:

    Abstract - Many hackers are self-taught and avoid powerful math tools that might let them take creations to the next level. We aim to create a structured set of modules consisting of hands-on 3D printing and electronics projects, with thorough text documentation and minimal supporting algebra. These modules will teach calculus in this hacker style both for self-learners and others, like the visually impaired, who need hands-on learning.

    When Isaac Newton developed calculus in the 1600s, he was trying to tie together math and physics in an intuitive, geometrical way. But over time math and physics teaching became heavily weighted toward algebra, and less toward geometrical problem-solving. However, many practicing mathematicians and physicists will get their intuition geometrically first and do the algebra later. We want to let people get to that point directly without passing through (much) algebra, particularly people who learn best by making something. Hacker Calculus

    Improving Zoom accessibility for people with hearing impairments People with hearing impairments often use lipreading and speechreading to improve speech comprehension. This approach is helpful but only works if the speaker’s face and mouth are clearly visible. For the benefit of people with hearing impairments on Zoom calls, please enable your device’s camera whenever you are speaking on Zoom, and face the camera while you speak. (Feel free to disable your camera when you aren’t speaking.)

    Read More