May 2022

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Zoom Brown Bag: A Virtual Environment for Training Blind People to Learn to Use Camera-Based Navigation Systems
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Abstract: Assistive navigation systems for blind people take images or videos as an input for various tasks such as finding the location of a user, recognizing objects, and detecting obstacles. Though the quality of the images and videos affect the performance of the systems significantly, manipulating a camera to have a clear image with proper framing is a challenging task for blind users. In this research, we explore the interactions between a camera and blind users in assistive navigation systems through interviews with blind participants and researchers in human-computer interaction and computer vision. We further develop a virtual environment where blind users can train themselves on manipulating a camera so that blind users can understand and effectively use gestures in the interactions identified in the interview such as scanning their environments with a camera and maintaining a desired camera position or orientation. This presentation shares the results of the interview, the method to implement the virtual environment, and a plan for evaluating the virtual environment through a user study. https://www.ski.org/users/jonggi-hong

Improving Zoom accessibility for people with hearing impairments People with hearing impairments often use lipreading and speechreading to improve speech comprehension. This approach is helpful but only works if the speaker’s face and mouth are clearly visible. For the benefit of people with hearing impairments on Zoom calls, please enable your device’s camera whenever you are speaking on Zoom, and face the camera while you speak. (Feel free to disable your camera when you aren’t speaking.)

 
 
 
 
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Zoom Colloquium: Dr. David Guyton will give a presentation entitled Revisiting the 2022 Jampolsky Lecture: Reaching for the Holy Grail in Strabismus: The Mechanism Underlying Infantile Esotropia
Event Date:

David L Guyton, M.D., Zanvyl Krieger Professor of Pediatric Ophthalmology Professor of Ophthalmology https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/profiles/details/david-guyton

Improving Zoom accessibility for people with hearing impairments People with hearing impairments often use lipreading and speechreading to improve speech comprehension. This approach is helpful but only works if the speaker’s face and mouth are clearly visible. For the benefit of people with hearing impairments on Zoom calls, please enable your device’s camera whenever you are speaking on Zoom, and face the camera while you speak. (Feel free to disable your camera when you aren’t speaking.)

 
 
 
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Zoom Brown Bag: Excitatory and Suppressive Contribution to Binocular Interactions in Human Visual Cortex
Event Date:

Abstract - During binocular viewing, visual inputs from the two eyes interact at the level of visual cortex. In normal vision, visual inputs from the two eyes are balanced. However, in amblyopic vision, visual inputs from the amblyopic eye are reduced due to loss of visual acuity and contrast sensitivity. In this talk, I will present my recent lab work on how excitatory and suppressive interactions contribute to binocular contrast interactions along the visual cortical hierarchy of humans with normal and amblyopic vision, using source-imaged SSVEP and frequency-domain analysis of dichoptic stimuli over a wide range of relative contrast between the two eyes. A dichoptic contrast gain control model was used to characterize binocular interactions in amblyopia and provided a quantitative comparison to normal vision. Our model fits revealed different patterns of binocular interactions between normal and amblyopic vision. Strabismic amblyopia significantly reduced excitatory contributions to binocular interactions, whereas suppressive contributions remained intact. Our results provide robust evidence supporting the view that the preferential loss of excitatory interactions disrupts binocular interactions in strabismic amblyopia. https://www.ski.org/users/chuan-hou

Improving Zoom accessibility for people with hearing impairments People with hearing impairments often use lipreading and speechreading to improve speech comprehension. This approach is helpful but only works if the speaker’s face and mouth are clearly visible. For the benefit of people with hearing impairments on Zoom calls, please enable your device’s camera whenever you are speaking on Zoom, and face the camera while you speak. (Feel free to disable your camera when you aren’t speaking.)

 
 
 
 
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