January 2022

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Zoom Colloquium: Exploring cortical dynamics of visual processing using magnetoencephalographic source imaging (MEG-I)
Event Date:

Abstract - Over the past several decades, magnetoencephalography (MEG) has emerged as an efficient technique to study brain function non-invasively with a high temporal resolution. Advancements in algorithms used to reconstruct this activity in “source space” (MEG imaging; MEG-I) allow neuroimagers to more accurately localize whereas on the cortical mantle changes in brain activity are coming from. Here, we provide several demonstrations where this technique can be applied to studies of visual cortical processing. Recent developments in our lab have pushed the boundaries of what can be achieved with these types of datasets, from accurate localization of koniocortical evoked fields to visuomotor integration and studying higher-order cognitive processing in neurological and psychiatric disorders. These types of approaches provide a strong non-invasive opportunity to understand how these cortices operate at a fine level in space and time for basic studies of visual neuroscience, understanding the neurobiological basis of visual disorders, and tracking brain plasticity through rehabilitation. https://brain.ucsf.edu/leighton-hinkley-phd

Improving Zoom accessibility for people with hearing impairments People with hearing impairments often use lipreading and speechreading to improve speech comprehension. This approach is helpful but only works if the speaker’s face and mouth are clearly visible. For the benefit of people with hearing impairments on Zoom calls, please enable your device’s camera whenever you are speaking on Zoom, and face the camera while you speak. (Feel free to disable your camera when you aren’t speaking.)

 
 
 
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