Photo of Steve Heinen

Heinen Lab

Our laboratory studies how visual perception and cognition guide the smooth pursuit eye movement system. The goal of our research is to provide information about basic neural mechanisms that drive this system that will aid in the diagnosis and treatment of vision and eye movement disorders. Basic knowledge about brain function obtained through this work should generalize to help better understand devastating disorders that affect movement and perception such as schizophrenia, Parkinson's, and Alzheimer's diseases.

Tabs

Journal Articles
Wu, J., Sheng-hua, Z., Ma, Z., Heinen, S. J., & Jiang, J.. (2018). Foveated convolutional neural networks for video summarization. Multimedia Tools And Applications, 77(22), 29245-29267. http://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.1007/s11042-018-5953-1 (Original work published 2018)
Heinen, S. J., Badler, J. B., & Watamaniuk, S. N. J.. (2018). Choosing a foveal goal recruits the saccadic system during smooth pursuit. Journal Of Neurophysiology , 120(2), 489-496. http://doi.org/ 10.1152/jn.00418.2017 (Original work published 2018)
Watamaniuk, S. N. J., Bal, J., & Heinen, S. J.. (2017). A Subconscious Interaction between Fixation and Anticipatory Pursuit. Journal Of Neuroscience, 37(47), 11424-11430. http://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2186-17.2017 (Original work published 2017)
Conference Papers
Heinen, S. J. (1994). Evidence of a timing mechanism for predictive smooth pursuit in frontal cortex. In Contemporary Oculomotor and Vestibular Research: A Tribute to David A Robinson.

Pages

  • Brain image

    Smith-Kettlewell Brain Imaging Center

    Our work centers on human visual neuroscience and computational vision, especially in the areas of stereoscopic depth, form, symmetry, and motion perception in adults, and the development of tests

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